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dc.contributor.authorVaghi, Matilde M.
dc.contributor.authorHampshire, Adam
dc.contributor.authorKaser, Muzaffer
dc.contributor.authorFineberg, Naomi
dc.contributor.authorBrühl, Annette B.
dc.contributor.authorSahakian, Barbara J.
dc.contributor.authorChamberlain, Samuel R.
dc.contributor.authorRobbins, Trevor W.
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-08T01:21:31Z
dc.date.available2019-11-08T01:21:31Z
dc.date.issued2017-11-01
dc.identifier.citationVaghi , M M , Hampshire , A , Kaser , M , Fineberg , N , Brühl , A B , Sahakian , B J , Chamberlain , S R & Robbins , T W 2017 , ' Hypoactivation and Dysconnectivity of a Frontostriatal Circuit During Goal-Directed Planning as an Endophenotype for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder ' , Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging , vol. 2 , no. 8 , pp. 655-663 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bpsc.2017.05.005
dc.identifier.issn2451-9022
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 17665742
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: ef0465bb-d5b7-48b9-af72-84deb2f48526
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85025124284
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/21872
dc.description© 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
dc.description.abstractBackground The symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have been postulated to result from impaired executive functioning and excessive habit formation at the expense of goal-directed control and have been objectively demonstrated using neuropsychological tests in such patients. This study tested whether there is functional hypoactivation as well as dysconnectivity of discrete frontostriatal pathways during goal-directed planning in patients with OCD and in their unaffected first-degree relatives. Methods In total, 21 comorbidity-free patients with OCD, 19 clinically asymptomatic first-degree relatives of these patients, and 20 control participants were tested on a functional magnetic resonance optimized version of the Tower of London task. Group differences in brain activation during goal-directed planning were measured together with associated frontostriatal functional connectivity. Results Patients with OCD and their clinically asymptomatic relatives manifested hypoactivation of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during goal-directed planning coupled with reduced functional connectivity between this cortical region and the basal ganglia (putamen). Conclusions Hypoactivation of cortical regions associated with goal-directed planning and associated frontostriatal dysconnectivity represent a candidate endophenotype for OCD. These findings accord with abnormalities in neural networks supporting the balance between goal-directed and habitual behavior, with implications for recent neuropsychological theories of OCD and the major neurobiological model for this disorder.en
dc.format.extent9
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofBiological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging
dc.subjectConnectivity
dc.subjectEndophenotype
dc.subjectFrontostriatal circuits
dc.subjectGoal-directed
dc.subjectObsessive-compulsive disorder
dc.subjectPlanning
dc.subjectRadiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
dc.subjectCognitive Neuroscience
dc.subjectClinical Neurology
dc.subjectBiological Psychiatry
dc.titleHypoactivation and Dysconnectivity of a Frontostriatal Circuit During Goal-Directed Planning as an Endophenotype for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorderen
dc.contributor.institutionCognitive Neuropsychology
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Clinical and Pharmaceutical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Health Services and Clinical Research
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85025124284&partnerID=8YFLogxK
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.bpsc.2017.05.005
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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