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dc.contributor.authorWittenmyer, Robert A.
dc.contributor.authorWang, Songhu
dc.contributor.authorHorner, Jonathan
dc.contributor.authorButler, R. P.
dc.contributor.authorTinney, C. G.
dc.contributor.authorCarter, B. D.
dc.contributor.authorWright, D. J.
dc.contributor.authorJones, H. R. A.
dc.contributor.authorBailey, J.
dc.contributor.authorO'Toole, S. J.
dc.contributor.authorJohns, Daniel
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-21T02:07:21Z
dc.date.available2020-01-21T02:07:21Z
dc.date.issued2020-02-01
dc.identifier.citationWittenmyer , R A , Wang , S , Horner , J , Butler , R P , Tinney , C G , Carter , B D , Wright , D J , Jones , H R A , Bailey , J , O'Toole , S J & Johns , D 2020 , ' Cool Jupiters greatly outnumber their toasty siblings : Occurrence rates from the Anglo-Australian Planet Search ' , Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society , vol. 492 , no. 1 , pp. 377–383 . https://doi.org/10.1093/mnras/stz3436
dc.identifier.issn0035-8711
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 17816427
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 14fa96f2-2253-499c-aa77-36441b1dd9b4
dc.identifier.otherArXiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/1912.01821v1
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85079442719
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/22087
dc.descriptionThis article has been accepted for publication in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society ©2019 The Authors. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.
dc.description.abstractOur understanding of planetary systems different to our own has grown dramatically in the past 30 yr. However, our efforts to ascertain the degree to which the Solar system is abnormal or unique have been hindered by the observational biases inherent to the methods that have yielded the greatest exoplanet hauls. On the basis of such surveys, one might consider our planetary system highly unusual - but the reality is that we are only now beginning to uncover the true picture. In this work, we use the full 18-yr archive of data from the Anglo-Australian Planet Search to examine the abundance of 'cool Jupiters' - analogues to the Solar system's giant planets, Jupiter and Saturn. We find that such planets are intrinsically far more common through the cosmos than their siblings, the hot Jupiters.We find that the occurrence rate of such 'cool Jupiters' is 6.73 +2.09 -1.13 per cent, almost an order of magnitude higher than the occurrence of hot Jupiters (at 0.84 +0.70 -0.20 per cent). We also find that the occurrence rate of giant planets is essentially constant beyond orbital distances of ~1 au. Our results reinforce the importance of legacy radial velocity surveys for the understanding of the Solar system's place in the cosmos.en
dc.format.extent7
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofMonthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
dc.subjectastro-ph.EP
dc.subjectastro-ph.SR
dc.subjectPlanets and satellites: detection
dc.subjectPlanets and satellites: gaseous planets
dc.subjectTechniques: radial velocities
dc.subjectAstronomy and Astrophysics
dc.subjectSpace and Planetary Science
dc.titleCool Jupiters greatly outnumber their toasty siblings : Occurrence rates from the Anglo-Australian Planet Searchen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Marketing and Enterprise
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Astrophysics Research
dc.contributor.institutionCentre of Data Innovation Research
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85079442719&partnerID=8YFLogxK
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1093/mnras/stz3436
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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