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dc.contributor.authorHowe, Mark L.
dc.contributor.authorAkhtar, Shazia
dc.contributor.authorBland, Cassandra
dc.contributor.authorHellenthal, Maria V
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-21T02:07:22Z
dc.date.available2020-01-21T02:07:22Z
dc.date.issued2019-12-23
dc.identifier.citationHowe , M L , Akhtar , S , Bland , C & Hellenthal , M V 2019 , ' Reconsolidation or Interference? Aging Effects and the Reactivation of Novel and Familiar Episodic Memories ' , Memory , pp. 1-12 . https://doi.org/10.1080/09658211.2019.1705489
dc.identifier.issn0965-8211
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 18086169
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 10d7cf3a-0fef-459e-bafc-c2856e5a7c9b
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-1064-7743/work/67860711
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85077027039
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/22088
dc.description© 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Accepted for publication in Memory, 09/12/19.
dc.description.abstractWe examined aging effects in reconsolidation and interference in episodic memory by reactivating memories for well-learned items in young and healthy older adults while controlling memory strength and the degree semantic processes contributed to memory. In Experiment 1, young and old adults learned pairs of real words and images to a strict criterion. After 24-hours, half of the images were reactivated and new words were paired with the images and learned to criterion. Following a 1-week delay, recognition and source monitoring were measured for both sets of pairings. Experiment 2 was a replication of Experiment 1, but using previously unknown novel words and unusual images. As predicted, older adults needed more trials to learn both the A-B and A-C pairings. Older adults required more trials to learn the new associations for reactivated than the not reactivated pairs, although there was no main effect of reactivation and no Age x Reactivation interaction for measures of recognition one-week later. These results are inconsistent with previous findings concerning age differences in reactivation effects in episodic memory. Instead, they suggest that once memory strength and input from semantic memory are better controlled, young and old adults perform similarly on tests of long-term recognition memory.en
dc.format.extent12
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofMemory
dc.rightsEmbargoed
dc.titleReconsolidation or Interference? Aging Effects and the Reactivation of Novel and Familiar Episodic Memoriesen
dc.contributor.institutionBehaviour Change in Health and Business
dc.contributor.institutionLearning, Memory and Thinking
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research in Psychology and Sport Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology and Sports Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.date.embargoedUntil2020-12-09
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Accepted Version
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-12-23
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1080/09658211.2019.1705489
rioxxterms.licenseref.uriOther
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-12-09
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.date.embargo2020-12-09
herts.rights.accesstypeEmbargoed


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