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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Bobbie
dc.contributor.authorRogers, Samantha
dc.contributor.authorBlissett, Jacqueline
dc.contributor.authorLudlow, Amanda
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-05T01:05:24Z
dc.date.available2020-03-05T01:05:24Z
dc.date.issued2020-07-01
dc.identifier.citationSmith , B , Rogers , S , Blissett , J & Ludlow , A 2020 , ' The relationship between sensory sensitivity, food fussiness and food preferences in children with neurodevelopmental disorders ' , Appetite , vol. 150 , 104643 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2020.104643
dc.identifier.issn0195-6663
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 17527220
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 592bc709-9066-4fe0-a5c2-6f17f81b5aa4
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0003-0516-7929/work/70189378
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85080030861
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/22386
dc.description.abstractHeightened sensitivity to sensory information has been associated with food fussiness in both atypical and typical development. Despite food fussiness and sensory dysfunction being reported as common concerns for children with neurodevelopmental disorders, the relationship that exists between them, and whether they differ between disorders, has yet to be established. The current study aimed to examine sensory sensitivity as a predictor of food fussiness in three different neurodevelopmental disorders, whilst controlling for comorbidity amongst these disorders. Ninety-eight caregivers of children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD; n = 17), Tourette Syndrome (TS; n = 27), Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD; n = 27), and typical development (TD; n = 27) were compared using parental reports of child food fussiness, food preferences and sensory sensitivity. Children with neurodevelopmental disorders were reported to have significantly higher levels of both food fussiness and sensory sensitivity, with children with ASD and TS also showing significantly less preference for fruit than children with TD. Importantly, higher levels of taste/smell sensitivity predicted food fussiness for all four groups of children. In addition, taste/smell sensitivity fully mediated the differences in food fussiness between each group of neurodevelopmental disorders compared to the TD group. The findings highlight that food fussiness is similar across these neurodevelopmental disorders despite accounting for comorbidity, and that greater sensitivity to taste/smell may explain why children with neurodevelopmental disorders are more likely to be fussy eaters.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofAppetite
dc.subjectAttention deficit hyperactive disorder
dc.subjectAutism spectrum disorder
dc.subjectFood fussiness
dc.subjectSensory sensitivity
dc.subjectTourette syndrome
dc.subjectPsychology(all)
dc.subjectNutrition and Dietetics
dc.titleThe relationship between sensory sensitivity, food fussiness and food preferences in children with neurodevelopmental disordersen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research in Public Health and Community Care
dc.contributor.institutionWeight and Obesity Research Group
dc.contributor.institutionCommunities, Young People and Family Lives
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Health and Social Work
dc.contributor.institutionHealth and Clinical Psychology group
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research in Psychology and Sport Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology and Sports Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionPsychology
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology, Sport and Geography
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.date.embargoedUntil2021-02-24
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85080030861&partnerID=8YFLogxK
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2020.104643
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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