Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorIglesias, Xavier
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez, Ferran
dc.contributor.authorTarrago, Rafael
dc.contributor.authorBottoms, Lindsay
dc.contributor.authorVallejo, Lismaco
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez-Zamora, Lara
dc.contributor.authorPrice, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-25T12:01:30Z
dc.date.available2020-03-25T12:01:30Z
dc.date.issued2019-04
dc.identifier.citationIglesias , X , Rodriguez , F , Tarrago , R , Bottoms , L , Vallejo , L , Rodriguez-Zamora , L & Price , M 2019 , ' Physiological demands of standing and wheelchair fencing in able-bodied fencers ' , The Jounral of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness , vol. 59 , no. 4 , pp. 569-574 . https://doi.org/10.23736/S0022-4707.18.08413-X
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 13708797
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: e66d4acf-5fbd-42a3-b90b-c21e6c5729c4
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85063959297
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0003-4632-3764/work/92337154
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/22485
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUNDː The purpose of this study was to determine the cardiorespiratory demands of standing and wheelchair (seated) fencing in a group of able-bodied fencers during simulated competitive bouts.METHODSː Participants were ten male able-bodied fencers of regional level with previous training experience in wheelchair fencing. After a standardised warm-up participants performed two series of simulated competitive épée bouts (5 and 15 touches) in a random order, either while standing or while sitting in a wheelchair. Expired gas was analysed for oxygen consumption (V̇O2) and respiratory exchange ratio (RER) and heart rate were continually monitored. Energy expenditure (EE) was subsequently calculated.RESULTSː V̇O2, HR and EE peak responses were greater during standing than seated fencing (p< .05). Mean V̇O2 during all ST bouts (5 and 15 touch) was 43% greater than in WC fencing (44.2 ± 7.8 vs. 25.1 ± 5.4 ml·kg-1·min-1). Mean HR during the standing 5 and 15 touch bouts was 91% ± 20% and 84% ± 7% of that recorded during the seated bouts. HR, V̇O2 and EE data also indicated that the 15-touch bouts were more physiologically demanding than the 5-touch bouts (P < .01). The HR-V̇O2 relationship was similar between both fencing modes. The duration of the 5 and 15 touch bouts were shorter for the seated than the standing bouts (P < .01).CONCLUSIONSː The physiological demands of wheelchair fencing are lower than those for standing fencing. Furthermore, the physiology of 5 vs. 15 touch bouts, similar to those undertaken in fencing competition, also differs.en
dc.format.extent6
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofThe Jounral of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness
dc.titlePhysiological demands of standing and wheelchair fencing in able-bodied fencersen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology and Sports Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research in Psychology and Sport Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionSport, Health and Exercise
dc.contributor.institutionAdaptive Physiology and Functional Nutrition
dc.contributor.institutionHealth and Wellbeing
dc.contributor.institutionWeight and Obesity Research Group
dc.contributor.institutioni-dojo
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.date.embargoedUntil2019-04-01
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.23736/S0022-4707.18.08413-X
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record