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dc.contributor.authorBurges Watson, Duika
dc.contributor.authorDraper, Alizon
dc.contributor.authorWills, Wendy
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-23T00:06:21Z
dc.date.available2021-01-23T00:06:21Z
dc.date.issued2021-01-01
dc.identifier.citationBurges Watson , D , Draper , A & Wills , W 2021 , ' The chimera of choice in UK food policy 1976-2018 ' , British Food Journal , vol. 123 , no. 4 , pp. 1596-1609 . https://doi.org/10.1108/BFJ-10-2020-0982
dc.identifier.issn0007-070X
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 19018106
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 16987f78-af00-485a-afb2-0eb1ea6737dc
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85098529918
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/23743
dc.description© 2020 Emerald Publishing Limited. This accepted manuscript is deposited under the Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial International Licence 4.0 (CC BY-NC 4.0). Any reuse is allowed in accordance with the terms outlined by the licence, here: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/. To reuse the AAM for commercial purposes, permission should be sought by contacting permissions@emeraldinsight.com.
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This paper presents a critical discourse analysis of “choice” as it appears in UK policy documents relating to food and public health. A dominant policy approach to improving public health has been health promotion and health education with the intention to change behaviour and encourage healthier eating. Given the emphasis on evidence-based policy making within the UK, the continued abstraction of choice without definition or explanation provoked us to conduct this analysis, which focuses on 1976 to the present. Design/methodology/approach: The technique of discourse analysis was used to analyse selected food policy documents and to trace any shifts in the discourses of choice across policy periods and their implications in terms of governance and the individualisation of responsibility. Findings: We identified five dominant repertoires of choice in UK food policy over this period: as personal responsibility, as an instrument of change, as an editing tool, as a problem and freedom of choice. Underpinning these is a continued reliance on the rational actor model, which is consonant with neoliberal governance and its constructions of populations as body of self-governing individuals. The self-regulating, self-governing individual is obliged to choose as a condition of citizenship. Research limitations/implications: This analysis highlights the need for a more sophisticated approach to understanding “choice” in the context of public health and food policy in order to improve diet outcomes in the UK and perhaps elsewhere. Originality/value: This is the first comprehensive analysis of the discourse of choice in UK food policy.en
dc.format.extent14
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Food Journal
dc.subjectChoice
dc.subjectConsumers
dc.subjectDiscourse analysis
dc.subjectFood policy
dc.subjectGovernance
dc.subjectIndividualisation
dc.subjectPolicy framing
dc.subjectFood Science
dc.subjectBusiness, Management and Accounting (miscellaneous)
dc.titleThe chimera of choice in UK food policy 1976-2018en
dc.contributor.institutionNursing, Midwifery and Social Work
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research in Public Health and Community Care
dc.contributor.institutionWeight and Obesity Research Group
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Health and Social Work
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85098529918&partnerID=8YFLogxK
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1108/BFJ-10-2020-0982
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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