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dc.contributor.authorWilkes, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorWarner, Douglas
dc.contributor.authorEdmonds-Brown, Veronica
dc.contributor.authorDavies, Keith
dc.contributor.authorDenholm, Ian
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-30T00:12:17Z
dc.date.available2021-01-30T00:12:17Z
dc.date.issued2021-01-13
dc.identifier.citationWilkes , T , Warner , D , Edmonds-Brown , V , Davies , K & Denholm , I 2021 , ' Zero Tillage Systems Conserve Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi, Enhancing Soil Glomalin and Water Stable Aggregates with Implications for Soil Stability ' , Soil Systems , vol. 5 , no. 1 , 4 . https://doi.org/10.3390/soilsystems5010004
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 24439188
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 7970f886-47ee-4f75-8882-8ed399235ed4
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-9136-9713/work/87789491
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-6060-2394/work/87789571
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-9797-874X/work/87789576
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85099560978
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/23812
dc.description.abstractArbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM) fungi form mutualistic symbiotic relationships with approximately 80% of terrestrial plant species, while producing the glycoprotein glomalin as a structural support molecule along their mycelial network. Glomalin confers two benefits for soils: (1) acting as a carbon and nitrogen storage molecule; (2) the binding of soil microaggregates (<250 m) to form larger, more stable structures. The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that a correlation between glomalin and soil aggregation exists and that this is influenced by the method of seedbed preparation. The soils from two crops of winter wheat in Hertfordshire, UK, practising either conventional (20 cm soil inversion) or zero tillage exclusively, were sampled in a 50 m grid arrangement over a 12 month period. Glomalin and water stable aggregates (WSA) were quantified for each soil sample and found to be significantly greater in zero tillage soils compared to those of conventional tillage. A stronger correlation between WSA and glomalin was observed in zero tillage (Pearson’s coeffect 0.85) throughout the cropping year compared to conventional tillage (Pearson’s coeffect 0.07). The present study was able to conclude that zero tillage systems are beneficial for AM fungi, the enhancement of soil glomalin and soil erosion mitigation.en
dc.format.extent13
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofSoil Systems
dc.rightsOpen
dc.subjectTillage
dc.subjectglomalin
dc.subjectzero till
dc.subjectconventional till
dc.subjectwater stable aggregates
dc.subjectAgricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
dc.titleZero Tillage Systems Conserve Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi, Enhancing Soil Glomalin and Water Stable Aggregates with Implications for Soil Stabilityen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionAgriculture and Environment Research Unit
dc.contributor.institutionAgriculture, Food and Veterinary Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology, Sport and Geography
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Agriculture, Food and Environmental Management Research
dc.contributor.institutionWater and Environment
dc.contributor.institutionGeography, Environment and Agriculture
dc.contributor.institutionEcology
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Clinical, Pharmaceutical and Biological Science
dc.contributor.institutionCrop Protection and Climate Change
dc.contributor.institutionAgriculture and Environmental Management Research
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Published version
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-01-13
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.3390/soilsystems5010004
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


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