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dc.contributor.authorRose, Dawn C.
dc.contributor.authorOtt, Laurent
dc.contributor.authorGuérin, Ségolène
dc.contributor.authorAnnett, Lucy
dc.contributor.authorLovatt, Peter
dc.contributor.authorDelevoye-Turrell, Yvonne
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-26T15:30:02Z
dc.date.available2021-02-26T15:30:02Z
dc.date.issued2021-02-05
dc.identifier.citationRose , D C , Ott , L , Guérin , S , Annett , L , Lovatt , P & Delevoye-Turrell , Y 2021 , ' A general procedure to measure the pacing of body movements timed to music and metronome in younger and older adults ' , Scientific Reports , vol. 11 , 3264 . https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-82283-4
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 19312069
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 12a07238-573d-4c52-a5a4-a9fc71f922b3
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0003-2082-1650/work/89584210
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85101319780
dc.identifier.otherPubMed: 33547366
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/23959
dc.description© The Author(s) 2021. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
dc.description.abstractFinger-tapping tasks are classically used to investigate sensorimotor synchronization in relation to neutral auditory cues, such as metronomes. However, music is more commonly associated with an entrained bodily response, such as toe tapping, or dancing. Here we report an experimental procedure that was designed to bridge the gap between timing and intervention studies by directly comparing the effects of metronome and musical cue types on motor timing abilities across the three naturalistic voluntary actions of finger tapping, toe tapping, and stepping on the spot as a simplified case of whole body movement. Both pacing cues were presented at slow, medium, and fast tempi. The findings suggested that the task of stepping on the spot enabled better timing performances than tapping both in younger and older adults (75+). Timing performances followed an inverse U shape with best performances observed in the medium tempi that were set close to the spontaneous motor tempo in each movement type. Finally, music provided an entrainment effect in addition to pace setting that enabled better motor timing and greater stability than classically reported using a metronome. By applying time-stamp analyses to kinetic data, we demonstrate that tapping and stepping engage different timing modes. This work details the importance of translational research for a better understanding of motor timing. It offers a simple procedure that strengthens the validity of applying academic work and contributes in knowledge towards a wide range of therapeutic interventions.en
dc.format.extent16
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofScientific Reports
dc.subjectMotor Timing
dc.subjectSensorimotor synchronization
dc.subjectEntrainment
dc.subjectTapping
dc.subjectMusic
dc.subjectGeneral
dc.titleA general procedure to measure the pacing of body movements timed to music and metronome in younger and older adultsen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology and Sports Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research in Psychology and Sport Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionPsychology
dc.contributor.institutionPsychology of Movement
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology, Sport and Geography
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85101319780&partnerID=8YFLogxK
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-82283-4
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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