Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMeyler, Samuel
dc.contributor.authorBottoms, Lindsay
dc.contributor.authorMuniz, Daniel
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-09T09:30:01Z
dc.date.available2021-06-09T09:30:01Z
dc.date.issued2021-05-25
dc.identifier.citationMeyler , S , Bottoms , L & Muniz , D 2021 , ' Biological and methodological factors affecting VO2max response variability to endurance training and the influence of exercise intensity prescription ' , Experimental Physiology . https://doi.org/10.1113/EP089565
dc.identifier.issn0958-0670
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 25203394
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: e2dda9ab-7739-4fcc-9fae-5a9d8f270e31
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-6748-9870/work/95373458
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0003-4632-3764/work/95373523
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85107569999
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/24568
dc.description© 2021 The Authors. Experimental Physiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Physiological Society. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.abstractChanges in cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) in response to endurance training (ET) exhibit large variations, possibly due to a multitude of biological and methodological factors. It is acknowledged that ~20% of individuals may not achieve meaningful increases in CRF in response to ET. Genetics, the most potent biological contributor, has been shown to explain ~50% of response variability, whilst age, sex, and baseline CRF appear to explain a smaller proportion. Methodological factors represent the characteristics of the ET itself including the type, volume, and intensity of exercise, as well as the method used to prescribe and control exercise intensity. Notably, methodological factors are modifiable and, upon manipulation, alter response rates to ET, eliciting increases in CRF regardless of an individual’s biological predisposition. Particularly, prescribing exercise intensity relative to a physiological threshold (e.g. ventilatory threshold) is shown to increase CRF response rates compared to when intensity is anchored relative to a maximum physiological value (e.g. maximum heart rate). It is, however, uncertain whether the increased response rates are primarily attributable to reduced response variability, greater mean changes in CRF, or both. Future research is warranted to elucidate whether more homogenous chronic adaptations manifest over time among individuals, as a result of exposure to more homogenous exercise stimuli elicited by threshold-based practices.en
dc.format.extent15
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofExperimental Physiology
dc.rightsOpen
dc.titleBiological and methodological factors affecting VO2max response variability to endurance training and the influence of exercise intensity prescriptionen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research in Psychology and Sport Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionSport, Health and Exercise
dc.contributor.institutionAdaptive Physiology and Functional Nutrition
dc.contributor.institutionHealth and Wellbeing
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology, Sport and Geography
dc.contributor.institutioni-dojo
dc.contributor.institutionWeight and Obesity Research Group
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Published version
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-05-25
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1113/EP089565
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record