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dc.contributor.authorJones, Anna Catherine
dc.contributor.authorGutierrez, Roberto
dc.contributor.authorLudlow, Amanda
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-02T15:15:02Z
dc.date.available2021-08-02T15:15:02Z
dc.date.issued2021-07-01
dc.identifier.citationJones , A C , Gutierrez , R & Ludlow , A 2021 , ' Emotion production of facial expressions: A comparison of deaf and hearing children ' , Journal of Communication Disorders , vol. 92 , 106113 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcomdis.2021.106113
dc.identifier.issn0021-9924
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 25201820
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 53508577-3e0c-408f-9eee-34b09bc6134d
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85108303748
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/24943
dc.description© 2021 Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. This is the accepted manuscript version of an article which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcomdis.2021.106113
dc.description.abstractThe production of facial expressions is an important skill that allows children to share and adapt emotions during social interactions. While deaf children are reported to show delays in their social and emotion understanding, the way in which they produce facial expressions of emotions has been relatively unexplored. The present study investigated the production of facial expressions of emotions by young congenitally deaf children. Six facial expressions of emotions produced by 5 congenitally deaf children and 5 hearing children (control group) were filmed across three tasks: 1) voluntarily posed expression of emotion 2) responding to social stories 3) intentionally mimicking expressions of emotion. The recorded videos were analysed using a software based of the Facial Action Coding System (FACS), and then judged by adult raters using two different scales: according to the emotion elicited (i.e. accuracy) and the intensity of the emotion produced. Results using both measurement scales showed that all children (deaf and hearing) were able to produce socially recognisable prototypical configuration of facial expressions. However, the deaf children were rated by as adults as expressing their emotions with greater intensity compared to the hearing children. The results suggest deaf children may show more exaggerated facial expressions of emotion, possibly to avoid any ambiguity in communicationen
dc.format.extent11
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Communication Disorders
dc.subjectEmotion production, deafness, facial expressions
dc.titleEmotion production of facial expressions: A comparison of deaf and hearing childrenen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology, Sport and Geography
dc.contributor.institutionHealth and Clinical Psychology group
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research in Psychology and Sport Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionPsychology
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.date.embargoedUntil2023-05-24
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcomdis.2021.106113
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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