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dc.contributor.authorKakay, Sheku
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-04T09:30:02Z
dc.date.available2021-08-04T09:30:02Z
dc.date.issued2021-06-16
dc.identifier.citationKakay , S 2021 , ' The social class myth of collectivism: A qualitative study of the impact of social class on families’ meal interaction behaviour ' , International Journal of Advanced Research , vol. 06 , no. 9 . https://doi.org/10.21474/IJAR01/13079
dc.identifier.issn2320-5407
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 25604930
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 015b97e8-9110-46c0-a24d-e71aacbf57f4
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/24945
dc.description© IJAR, 2021. All rights reserved. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.abstractThe class distinction in the Sierra Leonean society is the primary determinant of families access to a balanced diet as well as the level of social interaction at mealtimes. The income earned by families, their status in society, level of education and the type of job they do, significantly determines the type of food they consume. This implies that, social class can act as the arbiter to families access not only to adequate, but quality food. It also influences the food variety available at mealtimes. The study shows that, many Sierra Leonean families experience the problem of daily food affordability challenges, which limits social interaction at the dinner table at mealtimes. Nevertheless, the findings also show that, irrespective of the social standing of families, table etiquette are important to the different social classes, as it provides the foundation for training and socialising children into becoming responsible adults.en
dc.format.extent12
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Advanced Research
dc.rightsOpen
dc.subjectSocial class
dc.subjectincome
dc.subjecteducation
dc.subjectauthority
dc.subjectoccupation
dc.subjectfamily/consumer behaviour
dc.subjectsocial interaction
dc.subjectcollectivism/individualism
dc.titleThe social class myth of collectivism: A qualitative study of the impact of social class on families’ meal interaction behaviouren
dc.contributor.institutionHertfordshire Business School
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.relation.schoolHertfordshire Business School
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Published version
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-06-16
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.21474/IJAR01/13079
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
rioxxterms.typeOther
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


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