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dc.contributor.authorFineberg, Naomi
dc.contributor.authorPellegrini, Luca
dc.contributor.authorWellsted, David
dc.contributor.authorHall, Natalie
dc.contributor.authorCorazza, Ornella
dc.contributor.authorGiorgetti, Valentina
dc.contributor.authorCicconcelli, Dorotea
dc.contributor.authorTheofanous, Elena
dc.contributor.authorSireau, Nick
dc.contributor.authorAdam, David
dc.contributor.authorChamberlain, Samuel R.
dc.contributor.authorLaws, Keith
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-16T12:00:01Z
dc.date.available2021-08-16T12:00:01Z
dc.date.issued2021-09-01
dc.identifier.citationFineberg , N , Pellegrini , L , Wellsted , D , Hall , N , Corazza , O , Giorgetti , V , Cicconcelli , D , Theofanous , E , Sireau , N , Adam , D , Chamberlain , S R & Laws , K 2021 , ' Facing the “new normal”: How adjusting to the easing of COVID-19 lockdown restrictions exposes mental health inequalities   ' , Journal of Psychiatric Research , vol. 141 , pp. 276-286 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2021.07.001
dc.identifier.issn0022-3956
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 25535245
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: f5ab3df5-c6f5-4391-ba3d-0ffea4aaf89e
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85109950002
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-7371-319X/work/98163913
dc.identifier.otherPubMed: 34271458
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-3635-7699/work/100872284
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/24980
dc.description© 2021 Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is the accepted manuscript version of an article which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2021.07.001
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Re-establishing societal norms in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic will be important for restoring public mental health and psychosocial wellbeing as well as economic recovery. We investigated the impact on post-pandemic adjustment of a history of mental disorder, with particular reference to obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptoms or traits. METHODS: The study was pre-registered (Open Science Framework; https://osf.io/gs8j2/). Adult members of the public (n = 514) were surveyed between July and November 2020, to identify the extent to which they reported difficulties re-adjusting as lockdown conditions eased. All were assessed using validated scales to determine which demographic and mental health-related factors impacted adjustment. An exploratory analysis of a subgroup on an objective online test of cognitive inflexibility was also performed. RESULTS: Adjustment was related to a history of mental disorder and the presence of OC symptoms and traits, all acting indirectly and statistically-mediated via depression, anxiety and stress; and in the case of OC symptoms, also via COVID-related anxiety (all p < 0.001). One hundred and twenty-eight (25%) participants reported significant adjustment difficulties and were compared with those self-identifying as "good adjusters" (n = 231). This comparison revealed over-representation of those with a history or family history of mental disorder in the poor adjustment category (all p < 0.05). 'Poor-adjusters' additionally reported higher COVID-related anxiety, depression, anxiety and stress and OC symptoms and traits (all p < 0.05). Furthermore, history of mental disorder directly statistically mediated adjustment status (p < 0.01), whereas OC symptoms (not OC traits) acted indirectly via COVID-related anxiety (p < 0.001). Poor-adjusters also showed evidence of greater cognitive inflexibility on the intra-extra-dimensional set-shift task. CONCLUSION: Individuals with a history of mental disorder, OC symptoms and OC traits experienced greater difficulties adjusting after lockdown-release, largely statistically mediated by increased depression, anxiety, including COVID-related anxiety, and stress. The implications for clinical and public health policies and interventions are discussed.en
dc.format.extent11
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Psychiatric Research
dc.subjectCOVID-19
dc.subjectCognitive inflexibility
dc.subjectLockdown release
dc.subjectMental-health
dc.subjectObsessive-compulsive
dc.subjectPandemic
dc.subjectAnxiety/epidemiology
dc.subjectPandemics
dc.subjectHealth Status Disparities
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMental Health
dc.subjectCommunicable Disease Control
dc.subjectSARS-CoV-2
dc.subjectDepression/epidemiology
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Mental health
dc.subjectBiological Psychiatry
dc.titleFacing the “new normal”: How adjusting to the easing of COVID-19 lockdown restrictions exposes mental health inequalities  en
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Health Services and Clinical Research
dc.contributor.institutionCognitive Neuropsychology
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Clinical, Pharmaceutical and Biological Science
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology, Sport and Geography
dc.contributor.institutionHealth Research Methods Unit
dc.contributor.institutionBasic and Clinical Science Unit
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research in Psychology and Sport Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionBehaviour Change in Health and Business
dc.contributor.institutionPsychology
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Future Societies Research
dc.contributor.institutionPsychopharmacology, Drug Misuse and Novel Psychoactive Substances Unit
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.date.embargoedUntil2022-07-06
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85109950002&partnerID=8YFLogxK
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2021.07.001
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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