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dc.contributor.authorRamon, Shulamit
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-19T13:45:01Z
dc.date.available2021-08-19T13:45:01Z
dc.date.issued2021-07-13
dc.identifier.citationRamon , S 2021 , ' Family Group Conferences as a Shared Decision-Making Strategy in Adults Mental Health Work ' , Frontiers in Psychiatry , vol. 12 , 663288 . https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2021.663288
dc.identifier.issn1664-0640
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 25792585
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 51fe65ef-5611-4e57-858f-4c09a080570d
dc.identifier.otherJisc: c3a6421e22ca4cc7a23a8595de1086f2
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85111390291
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/24992
dc.description© 2021 Ramon. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY).
dc.description.abstractFamily Group conferences (FGC) provide a system by which a client and their family reach jointly key intervention decisions, from a number of options proposed by professionals. The system originated in child protection social work. Conceptually FGC is based on the assumption that the family is potentially a supportive social system for an individual with a variety of difficulties, including mental ill health. Reaching a family network agreement can lead to long term positive outcomes in self-confidence and social relationships. This strategy of shared decision making (SDM) can re-unite the family around the client's needs and wishes. It fits well the strengths based and the recovery-oriented approaches to mental ill health. Methodologically, this article provides a narrative review of existing empirical research about FGC in the context of adult mental health. In addition, two community case studies consisting of videos of a mother experiencing mental ill health and a daughter are analysed in terms of their subjective experience of the FGCs they were involved in, and looks at both the process and the outcomes of FGCs. The key findings demonstrate a high level of satisfaction from participating in the FGC meeting, while the evidence pertaining to the outcomes is inconclusive. Only very few systematic review studies, or comparative studies of different approaches to family decision making, exist, and there are no studies which offer cost effectiveness analysis. Discussion: The observed gap between the satisfaction from the process of FGC by the participants vs. the inconclusive outcomes relates to the implementation phase, in which the decisions made by the family are tested. Evaluating FGC processes and outcomes is complex. A systematic and comprehensive research of the implementation process is missing at this stage. In conclusion, FGC is a promising strategy of SDM in adult mental health. The research evidence indicates the need for further exploration of its implementation process, evaluative methodology and methods.en
dc.format.extent10
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Psychiatry
dc.rightsOpen
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.subjectfamily decision making strategy
dc.subjectadult mental health
dc.subjectparticipation process
dc.subjectimplementation process
dc.subjectevaluation
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Mental health
dc.titleFamily Group Conferences as a Shared Decision-Making Strategy in Adults Mental Health Worken
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Allied Health Professions, Midwifery and Social Work
dc.contributor.institutionSocial Work, Mental Health and Learning Disabilities
dc.contributor.institutionNursing, Midwifery and Social Work
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Health and Social Work
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research in Public Health and Community Care
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85111390291&partnerID=8YFLogxK
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Health and Social Work
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Published version
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-07-13
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2021.663288
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
rioxxterms.typeOther
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


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