Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorJones, G.
dc.date.accessioned2008-10-30T09:23:24Z
dc.date.available2008-10-30T09:23:24Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationJones , G 2004 , ' Trusted? Third? Parties ' , Hertfordshire Law Journal , vol. 2 , no. 1 .
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 121148
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: dbf6cba5-7c31-4cb4-b310-041d3c9eee42
dc.identifier.otherdspace: 2299/2516
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/2516
dc.descriptionOriginal article can be found at: http://www.herts.ac.uk/courses/schools-of-study/law/hertfordshire-law-journal/home.cfm
dc.description.abstractTo ensure certainty in e-Commerce, a Trusted Third Party can be used to issue certificates, which act as an electronic equivalent to a witness acknowledging and authenticating the identity of the contracting party. The trusted third party issues the certificate which correlates the contracting party to a unique public key, which in turn is used in creating the digital signature. However, the European legislation, in particular, Directive 1999/93/EC on a Community framework for electronic signatures fails to ensure that the certificate is issued by a third party. Therefore a party can act as both a contracting party and a certificate issuer. This causes a conflict of interest, should a dispute arise, as authentication has not been performed by a party independent to those contracting.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofHertfordshire Law Journal
dc.rightsOpen
dc.titleTrusted? Third? Partiesen
dc.contributor.institutionHertfordshire Law School
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.relation.schoolHertfordshire Law School
dcterms.dateAccepted2004
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record