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dc.contributor.authorAbbott, Laura
dc.contributor.authorScott, Tricia
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Hilary
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-05T14:15:01Z
dc.date.available2022-01-05T14:15:01Z
dc.date.issued2021-12-26
dc.identifier.citationAbbott , L , Scott , T & Thomas , H 2021 , ' Compulsory separation of women prisoners from their babies following childbirth: Uncertainty, loss and disenfranchised grief ' , Sociology of Health and Illness . https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9566.13423
dc.identifier.issn0141-9889
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 26579500
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 50016e43-4721-4c62-97fc-66bceb0f0519
dc.identifier.otherJisc: 3f7b858c72644d0797dbd2b636129c21
dc.identifier.otherpublisher-id: shil13423
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85121685484
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-5778-7559/work/105911845
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-2072-7827/work/105911931
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/25284
dc.description© 2021 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Foundation for SHIL (SHIL).
dc.description.abstractThere is growing evidence to show increased mental ill health in women compulsorily separated from their babies at birth (Cantwell et al., MBRRACE‐UK, 2018:56). For imprisoned women, the risk of self‐harm and suicide may be exacerbated. This article draws on in‐depth interviews with a sample of 28 imprisoned pregnant women/new mothers, 10 prison staff and observations to discuss the experience of separation from or anticipation of separation of women from their babies. Oakley (Signs, 4:607–631, 1980) reflected on the transition to motherhood with reference to the sociology of loss of identity. Women who have been compulsorily separated from their babies experience subjugated loss out of place with societal norms. The experiences of compulsory separation, in relation to concepts of disenfranchised grief, resonate with Lovell's (Social Science & Medicine, 17:755–761, 1983) research into the altered identities of mothers when loss occurs through late miscarriage or stillbirth. Additionally, this type of complex loss also denies a woman her identity as a ‘mother’. This article offers a fresh sociological perspective on the ways loss and grief are experienced by women facing separation from their babies in prison, drawing on concepts of uncertainty, loss and disenfranchised grief.en
dc.format.extent18
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofSociology of Health and Illness
dc.rightsOpen
dc.subjectORIGINAL ARTICLE
dc.subjectORIGINAL ARTICLES
dc.subjectdisenfranchised grief
dc.subjectloss
dc.subjectmandatory separation
dc.subjectmothers
dc.subjectpregnancy
dc.subjectPrison
dc.titleCompulsory separation of women prisoners from their babies following childbirth: Uncertainty, loss and disenfranchised griefen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Allied Health Professions, Midwifery and Social Work
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Health and Social Work
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Engineering and Technology
dc.contributor.institutionPatient Experience and Public Involvement
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Astrophysics Research
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Health and Social Work
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Published version
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-12-26
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9566.13423
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


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