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dc.contributor.authorMoore, Currie
dc.contributor.authorSanthakumaran, Shalini
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Glen P.
dc.contributor.authorWilkinson, Thomas J.
dc.contributor.authorCaskey, Fergus J.
dc.contributor.authorMagadi, Winnie
dc.contributor.authorGair, Rachel
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Alice C.
dc.contributor.authorWellsted, David
dc.contributor.authorvan der Veer, Sabine N.
dc.contributor.editorBikbov, Boris
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-03T13:15:01Z
dc.date.available2022-03-03T13:15:01Z
dc.date.issued2022-03-02
dc.identifier.citationMoore , C , Santhakumaran , S , Martin , G P , Wilkinson , T J , Caskey , F J , Magadi , W , Gair , R , Smith , A C , Wellsted , D , van der Veer , S N & Bikbov , B (ed.) 2022 , ' Symptom clusters in chronic kidney disease and their association with people’s ability to perform usual activities ' , PLoS ONE , vol. 17 , no. 3 , e0264312 . https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0264312
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.otherJisc: 130503
dc.identifier.otherpublisher-id: pone-d-21-05457
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0003-4629-6858/work/123559688
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/25420
dc.description© 2022 Moore et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.description.abstractBackground: People living with a long-term condition, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD), often suffer from multiple symptoms simultaneously, making symptom management challenging. This study aimed to identify symptom clusters in adults with CKD across treatment groups and investigate their association with people’s ability to perform their usual activities.  Methods: We conducted a secondary analysis of both cross-sectional and longitudinal data collected as part of a national service improvement programme in 14 kidney centres in England, UK. This data included symptom severity (17 items, POS-S Renal) and the extent to which people had problems performing their usual activities (single item, EQ-5D-5L). We categorised data by treatment group: haemodialysis (n = 1,462), transplantation (n = 866), peritoneal dialysis (n = 127), or CKD without kidney replacement therapy (CKD non-KRT; n = 684). We used principal component analysis to identify symptom clusters per treatment group, and proportional odds models to assess the association between clusters and usual activities.  Results: Overall, clusters related to: lack of energy and mobility; gastrointestinal; skin; and mental health. Across groups, the ‘lack of energy and mobility’ clusters were associated with having problems with usual activities, with odds ratios (OR) ranging between 1.24 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21–1.57) for haemodialysis and 1.56 for peritoneal dialysis (95% CI, 1.28–1.90). This association was confirmed longitudinally in haemodialysis (n = 399) and transplant (n = 249) subgroups. Implications: Our findings suggest that healthcare professionals should consider routinely assessing symptoms in the ‘lack of energy & mobility’ cluster in all people with CKD, regardless of whether they volunteer this information; not addressing these symptoms is likely to be related to them having problems with performing usual activities. Future studies should explore why symptoms within clusters commonly co-occur and how they interrelate. This will inform the development of cluster-level symptom management interventions with enhanced potential to improve outcomes for people with CKD.en
dc.format.extent16
dc.format.extent1410827
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONE
dc.subjectResearch Article
dc.subjectMedicine and health sciences
dc.subjectBiology and life sciences
dc.subjectResearch and analysis methods
dc.subjectPhysical sciences
dc.titleSymptom clusters in chronic kidney disease and their association with people’s ability to perform usual activitiesen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionHealth Research Methods Unit
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Health Services and Clinical Research
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology, Sport and Geography
dc.contributor.institutionPsychology and NeuroDiversity Applied Research Unit
dc.contributor.institutionBasic and Clinical Science Unit
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research in Psychology and Sport Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionBehaviour Change in Health and Business
dc.contributor.institutionPsychology
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1371/journal.pone.0264312
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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