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dc.contributor.authorJenkinson, P.
dc.contributor.authorEdelstyn, N.M.J.
dc.contributor.authorStephen, R.
dc.contributor.authorEllis, S.J.
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-07T11:27:38Z
dc.date.available2011-04-07T11:27:38Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationJenkinson , P , Edelstyn , N M J , Stephen , R & Ellis , S J 2009 , ' Why are some Parkinson’s disease patients unaware of their dyskinesias? ' , Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology , vol. 22 , no. 2 , pp. 117-121 . https://doi.org/10.1097/WNN.0b013e3181a722b0
dc.identifier.issn1543-3633
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 192942
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 2d88acdc-edc4-4ef9-92a3-b7ed067b0142
dc.identifier.otherdspace: 2299/5579
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 68349153179
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/5579
dc.descriptionOriginal article can be found at: http://journals.lww.com/cogbehavneurol/ Copyright Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
dc.description.abstractObjective : To test the hypothesis that anosognosia-for-dyskinesias in Parkinson’s disease (PD) results from a failure to detect discrepancies between intended and actual movement. Background : PD patients often complain of drug-induced dyskinesias (involuntary movements) less than their carers. This remarkable unawareness is an example of anosognosia (i.e., unawareness of deficits associated with an illness). A better understanding of anosognosia-for-dyskinesias in PD is important to understanding the impact of the illness and side effects of treatment. Method : The ability to detect a discrepancy between intended movement and visual feedback about actual ovement was investigated in 6 PD patients with anosognosia-for-dyskinesias, 11 non-anosognosic PD controls with dyskinesias, and 22 healthy volunteers (HVs), using a mirror to reverse the expected visual consequences of an executed movement. Results : Non-anosognosic PD patients and HVs rated mirror-reversed movement as significantly stranger than normal movement (p=.024 and <.001 respectively), whereas PD patients with anosognosia-for-dyskinesias did not (p=.375). Conclusion: The findings support our proposal, in that PD patients with anosognosia-fordyskinesias do not report mirror-reversed movement (in which intentions and visual feedback conflict) as feeling distinct from normal movement.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofCognitive and Behavioral Neurology
dc.rightsOpen
dc.subjectanosognosia
dc.subjectdyskinesias
dc.subjectParkinson’s disease
dc.subjectforward model
dc.titleWhy are some Parkinson’s disease patients unaware of their dyskinesias?en
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dcterms.dateAccepted2009
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1097/WNN.0b013e3181a722b0
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


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