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dc.contributor.authorJenkinson, P.
dc.contributor.authorEdelstyn, N.M.J.
dc.contributor.authorStephen, R.
dc.contributor.authorEllis, S.J.
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-07T11:27:38Z
dc.date.available2011-04-07T11:27:38Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationJenkinson , P , Edelstyn , N M J , Stephen , R & Ellis , S J 2009 , ' Why are some Parkinson’s disease patients unaware of their dyskinesias? ' , Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology , vol. 22 , no. 2 , pp. 117-121 . https://doi.org/10.1097/WNN.0b013e3181a722b0
dc.identifier.issn1543-3633
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 192942
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 2d88acdc-edc4-4ef9-92a3-b7ed067b0142
dc.identifier.otherdspace: 2299/5579
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 68349153179
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/5579
dc.descriptionOriginal article can be found at: http://journals.lww.com/cogbehavneurol/ Copyright Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
dc.description.abstractObjective : To test the hypothesis that anosognosia-for-dyskinesias in Parkinson’s disease (PD) results from a failure to detect discrepancies between intended and actual movement. Background : PD patients often complain of drug-induced dyskinesias (involuntary movements) less than their carers. This remarkable unawareness is an example of anosognosia (i.e., unawareness of deficits associated with an illness). A better understanding of anosognosia-for-dyskinesias in PD is important to understanding the impact of the illness and side effects of treatment. Method : The ability to detect a discrepancy between intended movement and visual feedback about actual ovement was investigated in 6 PD patients with anosognosia-for-dyskinesias, 11 non-anosognosic PD controls with dyskinesias, and 22 healthy volunteers (HVs), using a mirror to reverse the expected visual consequences of an executed movement. Results : Non-anosognosic PD patients and HVs rated mirror-reversed movement as significantly stranger than normal movement (p=.024 and <.001 respectively), whereas PD patients with anosognosia-for-dyskinesias did not (p=.375). Conclusion: The findings support our proposal, in that PD patients with anosognosia-fordyskinesias do not report mirror-reversed movement (in which intentions and visual feedback conflict) as feeling distinct from normal movement.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofCognitive and Behavioral Neurology
dc.rights/dk/atira/pure/core/openaccesspermission/open
dc.subjectanosognosia
dc.subjectdyskinesias
dc.subjectParkinson’s disease
dc.subjectforward model
dc.titleWhy are some Parkinson’s disease patients unaware of their dyskinesias?en
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1097/WNN.0b013e3181a722b0
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstyperestrictedAccess


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