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dc.contributor.authorLees-Maffei, Grace
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-27T15:01:10Z
dc.date.available2011-09-27T15:01:10Z
dc.date.issued2008-03-01
dc.identifier.citationLees-Maffei , G 2008 , ' Introduction: Professionalization as a Focus in Interior Design History ' , Journal of Design History , vol. 21 , no. 1 , pp. 1-18 . https://doi.org/10.1093/jdh/epn007
dc.identifier.issn1741-7279
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 378911
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: bba4eb11-6025-49a6-8503-cad3928ddf76
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 57749143871
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-7474-5118/work/32378719
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/6499
dc.description© The Author [2008]. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Design History Society. All rights reserved. “This is a pre-copy-editing, author produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in the Journal of Design History following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version Lees-Maffei, G. (2008) 'Professionalizing interior design, 1870-1970 : an introduction.' Journal of Design History 21 (1) pp.1-18 is available online at: http://jdh.oxfordjournals.org/”
dc.description.abstractIn the industrialized West, the design of the interior has been conceptualized as a domestic and amateur phenomenon, and the domestic interior has been conceptualized as a feminine realm. This introductory article aims to overcome the tendency to conflate the interior, the domestic, the amateur and the feminine in three ways. Firstly, it engages with a broad definition of the interior, encompassing professional and amateur spaces in both domestic and extra-domestic contexts. Secondly, it examines processes of professionalization which, from 1870 to 1970, moved the practice and product of interior design beyond its amateur origins. Thirdly, the association of femininity and domesticity so fundamental to Western patriarchal society is here replaced with a concern for the professional practice of women, and men, as gendered subjects. These points are addressed in turn in the three parts of the article. This article argues for analysis of the historical processes by which professional status in conferred upon the act of designing. Professionalization is an extremely useful and revealing focus for understanding the genesis, characteristics and significance of interior design and design and its histories more broadly.en
dc.format.extent18
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Design History
dc.subjectdesign history
dc.subjectgender
dc.subjecthistoriography
dc.subjectinterior design
dc.subjectproffessionalization
dc.titleIntroduction: Professionalization as a Focus in Interior Design Historyen
dc.contributor.institutionSocial Sciences, Arts & Humanities Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Creative Arts
dc.contributor.institutionTheorising Visual Art and Design
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1093/jdh/epn007
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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