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dc.contributor.authorKirk, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorPine, Karen
dc.contributor.authorRyder, Nuala
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-04T10:01:11Z
dc.date.available2011-10-04T10:01:11Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationKirk , E , Pine , K & Ryder , N 2011 , ' I hear what you say but I see what you mean : the role of gestures in children's pragmatic comprehension ' , Language and Cognitive Processes , vol. 26 , no. 2 , pp. 149-170 . https://doi.org/10.1080/01690961003752348
dc.identifier.issn0169-0965
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 392606
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: fc2f9deb-fc7a-441f-9f0d-3574029ad692
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 78751686836
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/6546
dc.descriptionOriginal article can be found at: http://www.informaworld.com/ Copyright Taylor & Francis [Full text of this article is not available in the UHRA]
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated whether gesture can enhance the pragmatic comprehension of language impaired children. Language impaired children (N=21) and age matched typically developing children (N=26) were presented verbal scenarios in two conditions: speech only and speech+gesture. In the speech+ gesture condition, speech was accompanied by iconic gestures which conveyed relevant semantic information complimentary to the spoken message. Children were asked questions about each scenario that required them to make inferences beyond what was explicitly stated. All children answered more questions correctly when verbal scenarios were accompanied by gesture, however, this difference was only significant for language impaired children. To examine whether children integrated the information conveyed by gesture into their representation of the spoken message, we analysed the gestures children produced as they answered the questions. Children gestured more when they were verbalising correct inferences than incorrect ones. Furthermore, children, especially those with specific language impairment, produced the same gestures that they observed and were more likely to do so in correct rather than incorrect answers. Gestures make a crucial contribution to an utterance's meaning, helping children, especially those with a language impairment to understand speech that requires meaning to be inferred.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofLanguage and Cognitive Processes
dc.rights/dk/atira/pure/core/openaccesspermission/open
dc.subjectcomprehension
dc.subjectgesture
dc.subjectnonverbal
dc.subjectspecific language impairment
dc.titleI hear what you say but I see what you mean : the role of gestures in children's pragmatic comprehensionen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology
dc.contributor.institutionHealth & Human Sciences Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionPsychology
dc.contributor.institutionApplied and Practice-based Research
dc.contributor.institutionLearning, Memory and Thinking
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Accepted Version
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1080/01690961003752348
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeopenAccess


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