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dc.contributor.authorLaws, K.R.
dc.contributor.authorGale, T.M.
dc.contributor.authorFrank, R.
dc.contributor.authorDavey, N.
dc.date.accessioned2007-09-21T08:45:11Z
dc.date.available2007-09-21T08:45:11Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.citationLaws , K R , Gale , T M , Frank , R & Davey , N 2002 , ' Visual similarity is greater for line drawings of nonliving than living things: The importance of musical instruments and body-parts ' , Brain and Cognition , vol. 48 , pp. 421-424 .
dc.identifier.issn0278-2626
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 193412
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 1f5dc74b-ad19-4b6a-81a5-da58ccc0c13b
dc.identifier.otherdspace: 2299/659
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 0036211880
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/659
dc.descriptionOriginal article can be found at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/02782626 --Copyright Elsevier Inc.
dc.description.abstractIt has been argued that greater intra-category structural similarity for living things, and the subsequent ‘‘visual crowding,’’ makes them more difficult to recognize and name for neurologically damaged individuals and normal subjects (Humphreys et al., 1988). Nevertheless, the precise meaning and quantification of structural similarity remains unclear, as does the rationale for why it necessarily should be greater for living things. We derived a new measure of visual overlap from the Snodgrass and Vanderwart corpus of line drawings: the degree of pixel overlap within subcategories (Euclidean distance: ED). Contrary to existing notions of visual crowding and extant measures of contour overlap, within-category ED indicated less within-category visual overlap for living things. Furthermore, musical instruments clustered with living things (having low overlap), while body parts clustered with nonliving things (having high overlap). These counter-intuitive findings accord with patient data and thus, provide evidence for the psychological reality and utility of ED.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofBrain and Cognition
dc.rights/dk/atira/pure/core/openaccesspermission/open
dc.subjectComputer Science
dc.titleVisual similarity is greater for line drawings of nonliving than living things: The importance of musical instruments and body-partsen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstyperestrictedAccess


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