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dc.contributor.authorRamsay, G.
dc.contributor.authorBarclay, T.
dc.contributor.authorNapiwotzki, R.
dc.contributor.authorBarclay, T.
dc.contributor.authorCropper, M.
dc.contributor.authorHakala, P.
dc.contributor.authorPotter, S.
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-01T12:01:09Z
dc.date.available2011-11-01T12:01:09Z
dc.date.issued2011-10-01
dc.identifier.citationRamsay , G , Barclay , T , Napiwotzki , R , Barclay , T , Cropper , M , Hakala , P & Potter , S 2011 , ' New short-period stellar pulsators at large Galactocentric distances ' , Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society , vol. 417 , no. 1 , pp. 400-407 . https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2966.2011.19275.x
dc.identifier.issn0035-8711
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 435904
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: fc5878ad-12e3-41e0-b2d8-30b5de51bdf5
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 80053563167
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/6847
dc.descriptionThe definitive version can be found at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/ Copyright Royal Astronomical Society
dc.description.abstractWe report the discovery of 31 blue, short-period, pulsators made using data taken as part of the Rapid Temporal Survey (RATS). We find that they have periods between 51 and 83 min and full amplitudes between 0.05 and 0.65mag. Using the period-luminosity relationship for short-period pulsating stars, we determine their distance. Assuming that they are pulsating in either the fundamental or first overtone radial mode the majority are located at a distance greater than 3 kpc, with several being more than 20kpc distant. Most stars are at least 1kpc distant from the Galactic plane, with three being more than 10kpc. One is located in the direction of the Galactic anticentre and has a Galactocentric distance of ∼30kpc and is ∼20kpc below the plane: they are therefore potential tracers of the Galactic structure. We have obtained low-resolution spectra for a small number of our targets and find that they have temperatures between 7200 and 7900K and a metal content less than solar. The colours of the pulsators and the spectral fits to those stars for which we have spectra indicate that they are either SX Phe or δ Scuti stars. We estimate the number of SX Phe stars in our Galaxy and find significantly fewer per unit mass than reported in massive globular clusters or dwarf spheroidal galaxies.en
dc.format.extent8
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofMonthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
dc.rights/dk/atira/pure/core/openaccesspermission/embargoed
dc.subjectgalaxy: halo
dc.subjectstars: evolution
dc.subjectstars: variables
dc.subjectδ Scuti
dc.subjectsurveys
dc.titleNew short-period stellar pulsators at large Galactocentric distancesen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics
dc.contributor.institutionScience & Technology Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Astrophysics Research
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.date.embargoedUntil2012-04-01
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80053563167&partnerID=8YFLogxK
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Accepted Version
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2966.2011.19275.x
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2012-04-01+01:00
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.date.embargo2012-04-01+01:00
herts.rights.accesstypeopenAccess


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