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dc.contributor.authorMoorhead, A.V.
dc.contributor.authorFord, E.B.
dc.contributor.authorMorehead, R.C.
dc.contributor.authorRowe, J.
dc.contributor.authorCaldwell, D.A.
dc.contributor.authorJenkins, J.M.
dc.contributor.authorLi, J.
dc.contributor.authorQuintana, E.
dc.contributor.authorBorucki, W.J.
dc.contributor.authorBryson, S.T.
dc.contributor.authorKoch, D.G.
dc.contributor.authorJenkins, J.M.
dc.contributor.authorLi, J.
dc.contributor.authorLissauer, J.J.
dc.contributor.authorQuintana, E.
dc.contributor.authorBatalha, N.M.
dc.contributor.authorFabrycky, D.C.
dc.contributor.authorGautier, T.N.
dc.contributor.authorHolman, M.J.
dc.contributor.authorQuinn, S.N.
dc.contributor.authorRagozzine, D.
dc.contributor.authorTorres, G.
dc.contributor.authorLucas, P.W.
dc.contributor.authorMarcy, G.W.
dc.contributor.authorShporer, A.
dc.contributor.authorStill, M.
dc.contributor.authorShporer, A.
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-30T13:01:07Z
dc.date.available2011-11-30T13:01:07Z
dc.date.issued2011-11-01
dc.identifier.citationMoorhead , A V , Ford , E B , Morehead , R C , Rowe , J , Caldwell , D A , Jenkins , J M , Li , J , Quintana , E , Borucki , W J , Bryson , S T , Koch , D G , Jenkins , J M , Li , J , Lissauer , J J , Quintana , E , Batalha , N M , Fabrycky , D C , Gautier , T N , Holman , M J , Quinn , S N , Ragozzine , D , Torres , G , Lucas , P W , Marcy , G W , Shporer , A , Still , M & Shporer , A 2011 , ' The distribution of transit durations for Kepler planet candidates and implications for their orbital eccentricities ' , Astrophysical Journal, Supplement Series , vol. 197 , no. 1 , 1 . https://doi.org/10.1088/0067-0049/197/1/1
dc.identifier.issn0067-0049
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 466006
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: fbfd95b8-ab2d-4ca4-a1e9-c31917336c0f
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 80655124830
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-8872-4462/work/62748860
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/7202
dc.description‘In these times, during the rise in the popularity of institutional repositories, the Society does not forbid authors from depositing their work in such repositories. However, the AAS regards the deposit of scholarly work in such repositories to be a decision of the individual scholar, as long as the individual's actions respect the diligence of the journals and their reviewers.’ Original article can be found at : http://iopscience.iop.org/ Copyright American Astronomical Society
dc.description.abstractDoppler planet searches have discovered that giant planets follow orbits with a wide range of orbital eccentricities, revolutionizing theories of planet formation. The discovery of hundreds of exoplanet candidates by NASA's Kepler mission enables astronomers to characterize the eccentricity distribution of small exoplanets. Measuring the eccentricity of individual planets is only practical in favorable cases that are amenable to complementary techniques (e.g., radial velocities, transit timing variations, occultation photometry). Yet even in the absence of individual eccentricities, it is possible to study the distribution of eccentricities based on the distribution of transit durations (relative to the maximum transit duration for a circular orbit). We analyze the transit duration distribution of Kepler planet candidates. We find that for host stars with T > 5100 K we cannot invert this to infer the eccentricity distribution at this time due to uncertainties and possible systematics in the host star densities. With this limitation in mind, we compare the observed transit duration distribution with models to rule out extreme distributions. If we assume a Rayleigh eccentricity distribution for Kepler planet candidates, then we find best fits with a mean eccentricity of 0.1-0.25 for host stars with T ≤ 5100 K. We compare the transit duration distribution for different subsets of Kepler planet candidates and discuss tentative trends with planetary radius and multiplicity. High-precision spectroscopic follow-up observations for a large sample of host stars will be required to confirm which trends are real and which are the results of systematic errors in stellar radii. Finally, we identify planet candidates that must be eccentric or have a significantly underestimated stellar radius.en
dc.format.extent30
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofAstrophysical Journal, Supplement Series
dc.rightsOpen
dc.titleThe distribution of transit durations for Kepler planet candidates and implications for their orbital eccentricitiesen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics
dc.contributor.institutionScience & Technology Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Astrophysics Research
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80655124830&partnerID=8YFLogxK
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Accepted Version
dcterms.dateAccepted2011-11-01
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1088/0067-0049/197/1/1
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


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