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dc.contributor.authorCorazza, Ornella
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-12T12:00:56Z
dc.date.available2012-09-12T12:00:56Z
dc.date.issued2010-01-01
dc.identifier.citationCorazza , O 2010 , ' Exploring space consciousness and other dissociative experiences : A Japanese perspective ' Journal of Consciousness Studies , vol. 17 , no. 7-8 , pp. 173-190 .
dc.identifier.issn1355-8250
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 1007381
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: c0f0516f-9ef0-4268-bee2-7318d12549fa
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 77955675191
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/8972
dc.descriptionCopyright 2010 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.
dc.description.abstractThe field of consciousness studies has long benefitted from the investigation of non-ordinary states of consciousness, both spontaneous and facilitated by mind-altering agents. In the present study, I look at the implications of spontaneous near-death experiences (NDEs) and experiences facilitated by the dissociative anaesthetic ketamine. These experiences reputedly have similar phenomenologies, such as a feeling of dying, motion through darkness, entering another realm, visions of light, and a sense of separation from the physical body. To assess whether ketamine and near-death experiences really are similar, I undertake a systematic comparison of 36 accounts of NDE-like experiences under ketamine with 36 accounts of NDE that resulted from (a) cardiac arrest or (b) other life-threatening circumstances in which wakefulness was maintained (e.g. car accident, childbirth). The results suggest that ketamine and near-death experiences are indeed similar, which might be taken to imply that NDEs have a purely chemical or psychophysiological basis. However, this conclusion is not inevitable, and I draw upon the intriguing 'spatial' or 'situated' characteristic of ketamine and near-death experiences to suggest an alternative to both neuropsychological reductionism and a straightforward post-mortem survival theory. To develop the idea of a dynamic interrelation of consciousness and 'place', I draw on contemporary Japanese philosophies of body-mind.en
dc.format.extent18
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Consciousness Studies
dc.titleExploring space consciousness and other dissociative experiences : A Japanese perspectiveen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionHealth & Human Sciences Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Postgraduate Medicine
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Clinical Practice, Safe Medicines and Drug Misuse Research
dc.contributor.institutionPostgraduate Medicine
dc.contributor.institutionHealth Services and Medicine
dc.contributor.institutionPublic Health
dc.contributor.institutionPrescription and Illicit Drug Misuse
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Pharmacy
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77955675191&partnerID=8YFLogxK
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.imprint.co.uk/jcs.html
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstyperestrictedAccess


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