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dc.contributor.authorLewis, Kathleen
dc.contributor.authorTzilivakis, J.
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-03T12:59:57Z
dc.date.available2012-12-03T12:59:57Z
dc.date.issued2000
dc.identifier.citationLewis , K & Tzilivakis , J 2000 , ' The role of the EMA software in integrated crop management and its commercial uptake ' , Pest Management Science , vol. 56 , no. 11 , pp. 969-973 . https://doi.org/10.1002/1526-4998(200011)56:11<969::AID-PS239>3.0.CO;2-F
dc.identifier.issn1526-498X
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 126805
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 3dfda206-284e-4514-93f4-aa130bdb2f76
dc.identifier.otherdspace: 2299/5009
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 0033786122
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/9269
dc.descriptionThis document is the Accepted Manuscript version of the following article: Kathleen Lewis and John Tzilivakis, ‘The role of the EMA software in integrated crop management and its commercial uptake’, Pest Management Science, Vol. 56 (11): 969-973, first published online 13 October 2000. The version of record is available online at doi: DOI: 10.1002/1526-4998(200011). Copyright © 2000 Society of Chemical Industry. Based on a paper presented at the symposium ‘The Economic and Commercial Impact of Integrated Crop Management’, organised by the SCI Crop Protection Group in collaboration with the Volcani Center, Israel and the Fresh Produce Consortium and held on 3–4 April 2000 at 14/15 Belgrave Square, London SW1X 8PS, UK.
dc.description.abstractIntegrated crop management (ICM) balances the issues of profitability and sustainability with the need for concern for the environmental as a whole. As such, it requires sound decision-making based on detailed knowledge of the integrated nature of farming and how any single activity can impact on the business viability (short- and long-term) and on the environment. This paper reports the development and use of a practical software package, Environmental Management for Agriculture (EMA), designed to support farmers, advisers and others in developing ICM practices. An exercise in technology transfer, the package uses a simple, but effective, technique relying on input data and information readily available on farm or stored in the system's databases. The paper explains how EMA can support ICM, provides an analysis of the identified user-groups and an insight into how the package is being used by these different groups. It also discusses advantages and disadvantages of using software tools in ICM decision making.en
dc.format.extent5
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofPest Management Science
dc.rightsOpen
dc.subjectintegrated crop management
dc.subjectdecision support systems
dc.subjectEMA software
dc.titleThe role of the EMA software in integrated crop management and its commercial uptakeen
dc.contributor.institutionHealth & Human Sciences Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Human and Environmental Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionGeography, Environment and Agriculture
dc.contributor.institutionAgriculture and Environment Research Unit
dc.contributor.institutionAgriculture, Veterinary and Food Sciences
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.description.versiontypeSubmitted Version
dcterms.dateAccepted2000
rioxxterms.versionSMUR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1002/1526-4998(200011)56:11<969::AID-PS239>3.0.CO;2-F
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


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