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dc.contributor.authorWiseman, Richard
dc.contributor.authorWatt, Caroline
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-17T11:59:34Z
dc.date.available2012-12-17T11:59:34Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationWiseman , R & Watt , C 2010 , ' Judging a book by its cover : the unconscious influence of pupil size on consumer choice ' , Perception , vol. 39 , no. 10 , pp. 1417-1419 . https://doi.org/10.1068/p6834
dc.identifier.issn0301-0066
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 369404
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: bc749707-5a53-49b1-b63f-fe567892f162
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000285371100012
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 78549283441
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/9410
dc.description"Wiseman, R., Watt, C. 2010. The definitive, peer-reviewed and edited version of this article is published in Perception, 30, 10, pp.1417 - 1419, 2010, 10.1068/p6834." [Full text of this article is not available in the UHRA]
dc.description.abstractPast research suggests that men perceive women with large pupils as especially attractive. We employed an innovative methodology to examine whether this effect influences consumer decision-making. A popular psychology book was published with two slightly different front covers. Both covers contained the same photograph of a woman; however, the woman's pupils on one cover were digitally enlarged. Readers indicated whether they were male or female, and whether they possessed the cover with small or large pupils. A significantly greater percentage of men than women had chosen the cover with the large pupils. None of the participants who attempted to guess the nature of the experiment was correct, suggesting that the influence exerted by pupil size was unconscious. These findings provide further support for the notion that people's judgments are unconsciously swayed by pupil size, and demonstrate that this effect operates in a real world setting.en
dc.format.extent3
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofPerception
dc.titleJudging a book by its cover : the unconscious influence of pupil size on consumer choiceen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionHealth & Human Sciences Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionPsychology
dc.contributor.institutionApplied and Practice-based Research
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dcterms.dateAccepted2010
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1068/p6834
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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