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dc.contributor.authorKnight, Rebecca
dc.contributor.authorHayman, Robin
dc.contributor.authorGinzberg, Lin Lin
dc.contributor.authorJeffery, Kathryn
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-19T14:28:54Z
dc.date.available2013-01-19T14:28:54Z
dc.date.issued2011-11-02
dc.identifier.citationKnight , R , Hayman , R , Ginzberg , L L & Jeffery , K 2011 , ' Geometric cues influence head direction cells only weakly in nondisoriented rats ' , Journal of Neuroscience , vol. 31 , no. 44 , pp. 15681-92 . https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2257-11.2011
dc.identifier.issn1529-2401
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 1352261
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: feee82d4-4c88-4d5b-acbc-cd251e222862
dc.identifier.otherPubMed: 22049411
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 80155123823
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-9400-9377/work/35672770
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/9706
dc.description.abstractThe influential hypothesis that environmental geometry is critical for spatial orientation has been extensively tested behaviorally, and yet findings have been conflicting. Head direction (HD) cells, the neural correlate of the sense of direction, offer a window into the processes underlying directional orientation and may help clarify the issue. In the present study, HD cells were recorded as rats foraged in enclosures of varying geometry, with or without simultaneous manipulation of landmarks and self-motion cues (path integration). All geometric enclosures had single-order rotational symmetry and thus completely polarized the environment. They also had unique features, such as corners, which could, in principle, act as landmarks. Despite these strongly polarizing geometric cues, HD cells in nondisoriented rats never rotated with these shapes. In contrast, when a cue card (white or gray) was added to one wall, HD cells readily rotated with the enclosure. When path integration was disrupted by disorienting the rat, HD cells rotated with the enclosure even without the landmark. Collectively, these findings indicate that geometry exerts little or no influence on heading computations in nondisoriented rats, but it can do so in disoriented rats. We suggest that geometric processing is only a weak influence, providing a backup system for heading calculations and recruited only under conditions of disorientation.en
dc.format.extent12
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Neuroscience
dc.rightsOpen
dc.titleGeometric cues influence head direction cells only weakly in nondisoriented ratsen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionHealth & Human Sciences Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionPsychology
dc.contributor.institutionCognitive Neuropsychology
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Published version
dcterms.dateAccepted2011-11-02
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2257-11.2011
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


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