Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWood, L. J.
dc.contributor.authorLehmann, H.
dc.contributor.authorDautenhahn, K.
dc.contributor.authorRobins, B.
dc.contributor.authorRainer, A.
dc.contributor.authorSyrdal, D.S.
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-10T10:17:28Z
dc.date.available2014-12-10T10:17:28Z
dc.date.issued2014-04-04
dc.identifier.citationWood , L J , Lehmann , H , Dautenhahn , K , Robins , B , Rainer , A & Syrdal , D S 2014 , Robot-Mediated Interviews with Children : What do potential users think? in AISB 2014 - 50th Annual Convention of the AISB . Society for the Study of Artificial Intelligence and the Simulation of Behaviour , 50th Annual Convention of the Society for the Study of Artificial Intelligence and the Simulation of Behaviour , AISB 2014 , London , United Kingdom , 1/04/14 .
dc.identifier.citationconference
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 7806692
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 57103f3e-db6d-4f96-80ac-59b4c9ae21e5
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84907406522
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/14901
dc.descriptionLuke Wood, Hagen Lehmann, Kerstin Dautenhahn, Ben Robins, Austen Rayner, and Dag Syrdal, ‘Robot-Mediated Interviews with Children: What do potential users think?’, paper presented at the 50th Annual Convention of the Society for the Study of Artificial Intelligence and the Simulation of Behaviour, 1 April 2014 – 4 April 2014, London, UK.
dc.description.abstractWhen police officers are conducting interviews with children, some of the disclosures can be quite shocking. This can make it difficult for an officer to maintain their composure without subtly indicating their shock to the child, which can in turn impede the information acquisition process. Using a robotic interviewer could eliminate this problem as the behaviours and expressions of the robot can be consciously controlled. To date research investigating the potential of Robot-Mediated Interviews has focused on establishing whether children will respond to robots in an interview scenario and if so how well. The results of these studies indicate that children will talk to a robot in an interview scenario in a similar way to which they talk to a human interviewer. However, in order to test if this approach would work in a real world setting, it is important to establish what the experts (e.g. specialist child interviewers) would require from the system. To determine the needs of the users we conducted a user panel with a group of potential real world users to gather their views of our current system and find out what they would require for the system to be useful to them. The user group we worked with consisted of specialist child protection police officers based in the UK. The findings from this panel suggest that a Robot-Mediated Interviewing system would need to be more flexible than our current system in order to respond to unpredictable situations and paths of investigation. This paper gives an insight into what real world users would need from a Robot-Mediated Interviewing system.en
dc.format.extent6
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSociety for the Study of Artificial Intelligence and the Simulation of Behaviour
dc.relation.ispartofAISB 2014 - 50th Annual Convention of the AISB
dc.rights/dk/atira/pure/core/openaccesspermission/open
dc.subjectArtificial Intelligence
dc.subjectModelling and Simulation
dc.titleRobot-Mediated Interviews with Children : What do potential users think?en
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Computer Science
dc.contributor.institutionScience & Technology Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Computer Science and Informatics Research
dc.contributor.institutionAdaptive Systems
dc.identifier.urlhttp://doc.gold.ac.uk/aisb50/#s19
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Computer Science
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Published version
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.typeOther
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeopenAccess


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record