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dc.contributor.authorWhiting, Lisa
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-02T10:03:01Z
dc.date.available2015-02-02T10:03:01Z
dc.date.issued2015-01-14
dc.identifier.citationWhiting , L 2015 , ' Reflecting on the use of photo elicitation with children ' , Nurse Researcher , vol. 22 , no. 3 , pp. 13-17 . https://doi.org/10.7748/nr.22.3.13.e1283
dc.identifier.issn1351-5578
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 8006846
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: db4afb7e-da70-46e8-bc18-aed8c831a2fc
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84925285647
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/15329
dc.descriptionDate of Acceptance: 05/12/2014
dc.description.abstractAim To reflect on the use of photo elicitation as a data collection method when conducting research with primary school age children (nine to 11 years). Background There is recognition that children feel an affinity with the visual medium; as a result, visual methods can be useful when conducting research with children. Photo elicitation is one such method, but there has been little discussion of its use with primary school children within a health context. This paper considers the main issues that researchers should consider. Data sources This paper draws on a research study conducted by the author that used an ethnographic approach and photo elicitation to identify the assets underpinning children’s wellbeing. Review methods A reflective discussion is used to highlight issues relating to the use of photo elicitation to collect data from primary school children. Discussion Photo elicitation is not without its challenges: it creates additional ethical considerations, and can be more time-consuming and expensive. However, children value the opportunity to be involved in research and have their opinions sought, and photo elicitation provides a method of collecting data that is appropriate for children’s developmental and cognitive maturational stages. Conclusion: Photo elicitation can be a positive experience for children, and one that is not only fun and engaging, but that is also empowering and valuing of their contributions. Implications for research/practice Research that uses photo elicitation needs to be carefully planned to ensure that the study is supported appropriately. The visual process can offer a unique insight into children’s lives that allows health professionals to deepen their understanding of children’s experiences.en
dc.format.extent5
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofNurse Researcher
dc.subjectChildren
dc.subjectethnographic approach
dc.subjectvisual methods
dc.subjectimagery in research
dc.subjectphoto elicitation
dc.subjectresearch
dc.titleReflecting on the use of photo elicitation with childrenen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Nursing (Children, Learning Disability and Mental Health) and Social Work
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Health and Social Work
dc.contributor.institutionHealth & Human Sciences Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionWeight and Obesity Research Group
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.7748/nr.22.3.13.e1283
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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