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dc.contributor.authorQuinton, Jean Charles
dc.contributor.authorCatenacci Volpi, Nicola
dc.contributor.authorBarca, Laura
dc.contributor.authorPezzulo, Giovanni
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-08T00:18:29Z
dc.date.available2018-09-08T00:18:29Z
dc.date.issued2013-09-06
dc.identifier.citationQuinton , J C , Catenacci Volpi , N , Barca , L & Pezzulo , G 2013 , ' The Cat Is On the Mat. Or Is It a Dog? Dynamic Competition in Perceptual Decision Making ' , IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man and Cybernetics, Part A: Systems and Humans , vol. 44 , no. 5 , pp. 539-551 . https://doi.org/10.1109/TSMC.2013.2279664
dc.identifier.issn1083-4427
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 15024534
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 2bd82f53-f899-4ff0-95b7-75a006dff7a4
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84899518408
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/20530
dc.description.abstractRecent neurobiological findings suggest that the brain solves simple perceptual decision-making tasks by means of a dynamic competition in which evidence is accumulated in favor of the alternatives. However, it is unclear if and how the same process applies in more complex, real-world tasks, such as the categorization of ambiguous visual scenes and what elements are considered as evidence in this case. Furthermore, dynamic decision models typically consider evidence accumulation as a passive process disregarding the role of active perception strategies. In this paper, we adopt the principles of dynamic competition and active vision for the realization of a biologically- motivated computational model, which we test in a visual catego- rization task. Moreover, our system uses predictive power of the features as the main dimension for both evidence accumulation and the guidance of active vision. Comparison of human and synthetic data in a common experimental setup suggests that the proposed model captures essential aspects of how the brain solves perceptual ambiguities in time. Our results point to the importance of the proposed principles of dynamic competi- tion, parallel specification, and selection of multiple alternatives through prediction, as well as active guidance of perceptual strategies for perceptual decision-making and the resolution of perceptual ambiguities. These principles could apply to both the simple perceptual decision problems studied in neuroscience and the more complex ones addressed by vision research.en
dc.format.extent13
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofIEEE Transactions on Systems, Man and Cybernetics, Part A: Systems and Humans
dc.rightsOpen
dc.subjectActive vision
dc.subjectdynamic models
dc.subjectperceptual decision-making
dc.subjectprediction
dc.titleThe Cat Is On the Mat. Or Is It a Dog? Dynamic Competition in Perceptual Decision Makingen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Computer Science
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Computer Science
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Accepted Version
dcterms.dateAccepted2013-09-06
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1109/TSMC.2013.2279664
rioxxterms.licenseref.uriOther
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


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