Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorQi, Aiming
dc.contributor.authorNi, Yuanzhi
dc.contributor.authorN. Mwabonje, Onesmus
dc.contributor.authorM. Richter, Goetz
dc.contributor.authorYeung, Kenny
dc.contributor.authorPate, Martin
dc.contributor.authorWoods, Jeremy
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-20T12:34:49Z
dc.date.available2019-08-20T12:34:49Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-01
dc.identifier.citationQi , A , Ni , Y , N. Mwabonje , O , M. Richter , G , Yeung , K , Pate , M & Woods , J 2019 , ' Assessing availability and greenhouse gas emissions of lignocellulosic biomass feedstock supply – case study for a catchment in England ' , Biofuels, Bioproducts and Biorefining , vol. 13 , no. 3 , pp. 568-581 . https://doi.org/10.1002/bbb.1966
dc.identifier.issn1932-104X
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 16162190
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 86c8d5ec-23c4-4c02-bcaf-854f767d8cfc
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85059853182
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/21608
dc.description© 2019 Society of Chemical Industry and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
dc.description.abstractFeedstocks from lignocellulosic biomass (LCB) include crop residues and dedicated per¬ennial biomass crops. The latter are often considered superior in terms of climate change mitigation potential. Uncertainty remains over their availability as feedstocks for biomass provision and the net greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) during crop production. Our objective was to assess the optimal land allocation to wheat and Miscanthus in a specific case study located in England, to increase bio¬mass availability, improve the carbon balance (and reduce the consequent GHG emissions), and mini¬mally constrain grain production losses from wheat. Using soil and climate variables for a catchment in east England, biomass yields and direct nitrogen emissions were simulated with validated process-based models. A ‘Field to up-stream factory gate’ life-cycle assessment was conducted to estimate indirect management-related GHG emissions. Results show that feedstock supply from wheat straw can be supplemented beneficially with LCB from Miscanthus grown on selected low-quality soils. In our study, 8% of the less productive arable land area was dedicated to Miscanthus, increasing total LCB provision by about 150%, with a 52% reduction in GHG emission per ton LCB delivered and only a minor effect on wheat grain production (−3%). In conclusion, even without considering the likely carbon sequestration in impoverished soils, agriculture should embrace the opportunities to provide the bioeconomy with LCB from dedicated, perennial crops.en
dc.format.extent14
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofBiofuels, Bioproducts and Biorefining
dc.subjectDNDC
dc.subjectfeedstock supply
dc.subjectgreenhouse gases (GHG)
dc.subjectlignocellulosic biomass
dc.subjectMiscanthus
dc.subjectSTAMINA
dc.subjectwheat straw
dc.subjectBioengineering
dc.subjectRenewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
dc.titleAssessing availability and greenhouse gas emissions of lignocellulosic biomass feedstock supply – case study for a catchment in Englanden
dc.contributor.institutionAgriculture, Veterinary and Food Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionGeography, Environment and Agriculture
dc.contributor.institutionCrop and Environmental Protection
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biological and Environmental Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.date.embargoedUntil2020-01-09
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85059853182&partnerID=8YFLogxK
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1002/bbb.1966
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record