Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSullman, M J M
dc.contributor.authorBaas, P H
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-08T14:01:03Z
dc.date.available2011-11-08T14:01:03Z
dc.date.issued2004-03
dc.identifier.citationSullman , M J M & Baas , P H 2004 , ' Mobile phone use amongst New Zealand drivers ' , Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour , vol. 7 , no. 2 , pp. 95-105 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.trf.2004.03.001
dc.identifier.issn1369-8478
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 445193
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: c5752e10-6d62-4763-9b65-da0f0d728a25
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000224291600003
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 2142701410
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/6941
dc.descriptionOriginal article can be found at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/ Copyright Elsevier [Full text of this article is not available in the UHRA]
dc.description.abstractResearch has shown that using a mobile phone whilst driving may increase the risk of being crash involved by as much as nine times. As around 65% of New Zealand's population own mobile phones, this represents a potentially very significant hazard. In order to effectively target interventions towards those drivers who use mobile phones while driving, information is needed about the characteristics of these drivers. The present study investigated the frequency of mobile phone use on New Zealand's roads and the characteristics of drivers who use mobile phones while driving. The research found that more than half (57.31%) of the participants used a mobile phone at least occasionally while driving. Those who reported using a mobile phone more often whilst driving tended to; be male, reside in a main urban area, report a higher annual mileage, drive a later model car with a larger engine, prefer a higher driving speed, have less driving experience (in years) and to be younger. In line with previous research, there was also a significant relationship between crash involvement and use of a mobile phone whilst driving. However, once the contributions of the demographic and descriptive variables had been partialled Out, using hierarchical logistic regression, the relationship between crash involvement and mobile phone use was no longer significant.en
dc.format.extent11
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofTransportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour
dc.subjectmobile phones
dc.subjectdriving
dc.subjectcellular phones
dc.subjectcellphones
dc.titleMobile phone use amongst New Zealand driversen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology
dc.contributor.institutionHealth & Human Sciences Research Institute
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dcterms.dateAccepted2004-03
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.trf.2004.03.001
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record